Adult

#HeartBeatsHate

Black Klansman: A Memoir

In 1978, Police detective Ron Stallworth launched an undercover investigation into Colarado Springs Ku Klux Klan activity. During the investigation, he gained membership into the KKK, eventually being asked to serve as the chapter leader, and even served as David Duke’s bodyguard. Did we mention that Detective Stallworth was black? Stallworth’s book explores how he worked to pull off this sting operation.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Known by scientists only as HeLa, Henrietta Lacks was an impoverished, black tobacco farmer whose cells were unknowingly taken in 1951 and used in a number of scientific studies, including the creation of the polio vaccine, insights into cloning and gene mapping, and breakthroughs in in vitro fertilization. Her cells have been bought and sold by millions, while family cannot even afford health insurance. Exploring the intersection of ethics, race, medicine, and trying to understand family.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

Long Walk to Freedom

This autobiography traces the history of Nelson Mandela’s fight against apartheid, his quarter-century of imprisonment, and his rise to serve as President of South Africa. A story of overcoming struggles and facing adversity, Mandela’s story continues to provide others with hope and the promise of a better future.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Racist thought is alive and well in contemporary America, despite many Americans beliefs to the contrary. In this book, Ibram X. Keni explores the long and lingering history of racist ideas, illustrating that they didn’t arise from ignorance and hatred, but rather were intentionally created to justify and rationalize the nation’s entrenched and discriminatory policies.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Author Patrisse Khan-Cullors was raised by her single mother in an impoverished Los Angeles neighbourhood, where she experienced the prejudice and persecution of black Americans at the hands of the police. In 2013, Patrisse’s outrage of Trayvon Martin’s killer going free led her, along with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi, to co-found Black Lives Matter. Championing human rights, despite being condemned as terrorists, Patrisse and her co-founders survived. An empower account of standing up, speaking out and pushing back.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

Black Like Me

In the 1950, America was divided by colour. And no where was this more pervasive, perhaps, than the deep south. White journalist John Howard Griffin decided to cross this colour line. Taking a medication to alter his skin tone, he gave up his privilege as a Southern white man to live a life as an unemployed black man. This memoir chronicles Giffin’s journey through the segregated south, as he experiences racism first-hand.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

The Reluctant Fundamentalist

September 11. For Changez, who left Pakistan to study at Harvard and work in New York CIty at a prestigious financial analysis firm, it was a day when the world shifted under his feet. Before September 11, he was in love with an American woman from New York’s society. He was successful. After September 11, he no longer knew where he belonged.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

In this thought-provoking book, author Robin DiAngle tackles American racism by challenging white supremacy. In it, she explains how white people have misunderstood the concept of racism, refusing to talk about it openly, and challenges all white people to be courageous enough to see their role in the existing racist system.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness

At seven, Austin learned her parents named her to deceive future employers into thinking she was a white male. In her book, Austin Channing Brown explores how many institutions are falling short on claims of valuing diversity. In it she explores how white, middle-class Evangelicalism is playing a role in fueling racial hostility in America.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Written when black Americans were celebrating the presidency of Barack Obama, hailed the nation’s “triumph over race,” the author explores how and why the majority of young black men in major American cities have been labeled felons and are spending their lives behind bars. Somehow, despite eliminating Jim Crow laws, many African American communities remain trapped in subordinate social classes. This critique argues that the racial caste system in America hasn’t been undone, only redesigned.

VIEW BOOK DETAILS